Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele BWV 654 #2,3, & 4

Here are three new realizations of the Bach Chorale “Adorn yourself, O dear soul” based on a hymn written around 1649 by Johann Franck and Johann Cruger. The tuning is derived from just two 16 note scales from the 31-limit tonality diamond, the otonalities on F (4:3) and Bb (16:9). For each chord I chose either of these otonal scales and freely switched between them. Because there are so many choices in the drunkard walk, I’ve included three variations for comparison.



ach

Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele BWV 654 #1

Here is a realization of the Bach Chorale “Adorn yourself, O dear soul” based on a hymn written around 1649 by Johann Franck and Johann Cruger. The tuning is derived from just two 16 note scales from the 31-limit tonality diamond, the otonalities on F (4:3) and Bb (16:9). For each chord I chose either of these otonal scales and freely switched between them.
Here’s an image of the diamond with the two otonalities highlighted: the 16:9 in green and the 4:3 in brown.

I’m going to run several more iterations to see if I can spin up some more unique chord progressions.
ach

or download here:
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele BWV 654 #1
ach

O Welt, ich muß dich lassen #4, 5, & 6

I’ve been working a lot with a spreadsheet to validate the tuning in cents, as opposed to just listening. Some of the keys just don’t comport well with the 31-limit tonality. While their “interestingness” is high, I think it’s important to hear what they sound like with a more or less historically accurate tuning. I found the last piece, in the key of F major was able to play almost all the just ratios I would have chosen if I didn’t restrict myself to the 16 note scales on the otonal and utonal that are available in 31-limit. But this chorale, “O Welt, ich muß dich lassen”, in the key of A major, just has too many 30-40 cent deviations from what just ratio I would prefer. So I redid the song using Carl Lumma’s VWRT temperament in A. It’s more conventional, and perhaps a lower interestingness, but here it is nonetheless. Three versions, since there is a lot of indeterminacy in the realization.



ach

Ach wie flüchtig, ach wie nichtig BWV 26 #3

Here is a finished version with slides alternating with the eighth note scalar moves (major and minor 2nds only).

This is one of Bach’s Chorales, scored for SATB, performed on Prent’s Microtonal Slide Bosendorfer. The title means “Ah, how fleeting, ah how insignificant” in English. I broke the piece up into its 39 quarter note length segments, and either play it straight, or backwards and forwards using the Markov Chain Drunkard’s Walk.

The tuning is derived from the 31-limit tonality diamond, with each quarter note segment assigned a scale that makes that chord sound best, including with 6/5 and 5/4 thirds, 3/2 fifths, and 7/4 flatted sevenths. That leaves some harsh notes, as the commas between chords are pronounced.

or download here:
ach #3
ach

Ach wie flüchtig, ach wie nichtig BWV 26

This is one of Bach’s Chorales, scored for SATB, performed on Prent’s Microtonal Slide Bosendorfer. The title means “Ah, how fleeting, ah how insignificant” in English. I broke the piece up into its 39 quarter note length segments, and either play it straight, or backwards and forwards using the Markov Chain Drunkard’s Walk. There are a lot of eighth notes, and in this version they are all discrete notes. I intend to make them have the option of slides in the next version.

The tuning is derived from the 31-limit tonality diamond, with each quarter note segment assigned a scale that makes that chord sound best, including with 6/5 and 5/4 thirds, 3/2 fifths, and 7/4 flatted sevenths. That leaves some harsh notes, as the commas between chords are pronounced. I may go back and make them slide from one chord to another so that they are masked. That’s for another version also.

or download here:
ach #1
ach

Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming #1

This is a transformation of Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming from the early 1600’s. Tuning is from the tonality diamond to the 31-limit, with each chord chosing the optimal 16 note scale to make the chord sound true. This leads to numerous comma transitions from one chord to another.

I use the Drunkard’s Walk Markov Chain to go forwards and backwards one chord at a time through the piece.

Stream online:


or download here:
Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming #1

rose