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Allemande #2

clover-final

This is a work in progress. The current version is a relatively straight forward performance of J.S. Bach’s first English Suite Allemande, first half. The tuning is from the 31-limit Partch Tonality Diamond, with a sort of major scale (shown here in the key of A) derived from the otonality using the following ratios:

  • A 1:1
  • B 9:8
  • C# 5:4
  • D- 21:16
  • E 3:2
  • F# 27:16
  • G- 7:4
  • G# 15:8

The D- and F# are a bit weird. But the G- as the flatted 7th, and the 7th overtone, is very sonorous, as is the 5:4 5th overtone. The piece modulates from A major to E, F#, and B major. I don’t have those keys, so in this case it modulates from A to E+, to F#, and to B. And these keys are in the far reaches of the tonality diamond. If you consider C to be a 1:1, then the ratios for these keys are:
32:19 32:17 32:25 32:23 and the relationships between the keys are nothing like what Bach would have expected. Instead of a simple set of low number ratios as keys to modulate through, I’m in another place. I’m not saying Back wouldn’t have run away screaming at the way this sounds, but my plan is to radically transform his Allemande in the future, much like I did the Tango in the previous piece. We shall see.

Here is a comparison of Bach’s expectations with what I’m using:
clover-final


or download here:
Allemande #2

Here is the score:
clover-final

Tango #21

Here we have the final version of Prent’s Microtonal Slide Bosendorfers. Three of these monsters were assembled with my semi-patented whammy bars for this final performance. Gotta love those bass note slides.

This version only includes the utonality keys, but frankly since the major or minor third is only present in 1 out of 16 notes, it doesn’t matter much.

I spent an afternoon cleaning up the Bosendorfer sample files. There were several samples containing loud noises, door slams, and other detritus. I can’s believe people sell these samples with flaws like this. On the other hand, most people play them on the piano and learn by intuition to lift their fingers off the keyboard before the crap shows up. This version is free of chair moves and high pitched noises. It still has the punch in the low notes. It was really only the quiet samples that had artifacts.

or download here:
Tango #21

Keys the algorithm chose. He goes left, then right, then left, the right, then right.

  • Cn-min
  • D+-min
  • Cn-min
  • An-min
  • Fn-min
  • An-min
  • Cn-min
  • D+-min
  • Gn-min
  • D+-min
  • Gn-min
  • B–min
  • D–min
  • En-min
  • F#-min
  • En-min
  • F#-min
  • Ab-min
  • A+-min
  • Bn-min
  • C+-min
  • Dn-min
  • E–min
  • Dn-min
  • C+-min
  • Bn-min
  • C+-min
  • Dn-min
  • C+-min
  • Dn-min
  • E–min

Tango #17

This one’s a bit longer. All major keys this time:

  • D#-maj
  • D–maj
  • D#-maj
  • E+-maj
  • D#-maj
  • E+-maj
  • F+-maj
  • G+-maj
  • An-maj
  • G+-maj
  • F+-maj
  • E+-maj
  • F+-maj
  • G+-maj
  • F+-maj
  • G+-maj
  • An-maj
  • Bn-maj
  • An-maj
  • G+-maj
  • An-maj
  • Bn-maj
  • C#-maj
  • E–maj
  • G–maj
  • E–maj
  • G–maj
  • A#-maj
  • G–maj
  • E–maj
  • G–maj

The idea of a Tango came from Ravel’s Vocalise-├ętude en forme de Habanera Tango-final

or download here:
Tango #17

Tango #16

This is a final version with some fixes to some envelopes and durations, and other challenges. It uses the following chain of utonanities (minor) keys. No major keys (otonalities) were chosen, just by chance.

  • Dn-min
  • C+-min
  • Dn-min
  • E–min
  • Dn-min
  • C+-min
  • Bn-min
  • C+-min
  • Bn-min
  • A+-min
  • Bn-min
  • C+-min
  • Dn-min
  • C+-min
  • Dn-min
  • E–min
  • Dn-min
  • E–min
  • E+-min
  • E–min
  • Dn-min

There is a list of potential keys that can be picked, 16 otonalities, and 16 utonalities. The randomizer chooses a key, then moves to the next one it the list, then back again. The list is ordered based on the Partch Tonality Diamond. The Markov Chain Drunkard Walk can only go forward or back in the list. In this iteration, only five keys are picked across the almost ten minutes of execution, out of a set of 32 possible keys. This particular drunk seems to always come back to the same spot, or almost. He starts at Dn-min and ends there. (The n stands for natural).
Tango-final

or download here:
Tango #16

Tangos #6, 7, & 8 on Prent’s Microtonal Slide Bosendorfers

I’ve been working on adding the Tango part, and these are three versions with the bass part from Ravel’s Habanera. There are some strange artifacts in the samples I’m using. It sounds like when they recorded some of the longer samples someone was walking around the studio, or dropped something on the piano strings. This is going to be very hard to diagnose, since there are 28 samples in each of the 11 sample sets. That means listening to nearly 300 sammples, some of which are up to 21 seconds long.
Tango-final

or download here:
Tango #6


or download here:
Tango #7


or download here:
Tango #8

Tango #4

More keys, more variation in tempo. There are lists of durations, velocities, and notes, and the system uses a Markov Chain Drunkard’s Walk to navigate them. That is, they can only go forward or backward in the lists of lists of lists. Still not a tango, but I’m just getting used to the sounds of the piano now.
Tango-final

or download here:
Tango #4

Tango #1

I’m just starting to work through two very new things. I bought a sample library of a Bosendorfer piano that included 11 different volume levels. To enable this, I’ve updated my source code to support a linkage between the requested volume and the sample chosen. It was actually only a few lines of Csound code that were required to add that capability. Finding those few lines was a bit of a challenge, but it was worth it.

I also have been incorporating a Partch tonality diamond to the 31-limit. That’s not 31-EDO, but rather the overtonality and utonality to the 31st overtone. Previously I had limited my work to the 15-limit, and frequently to the 11-limit. There is a whole world out there that I’ve only begun to hear for the first time. The current scale has 16 tones per o- or u-tonality, 216 in total per octave.

This piece is just an experiment to hear what it can do. It’s not yet a tango, but that will come later.


or download here:
Tango #1
2014-11-29 16.51.08