Resolution in Blue #16

This is another pass through the algorithm for this piece. A small change was made to the circle of fifths section. It had been restricted to either a rising or falling scale for the voicings of the tetrads in the circle. This version includes an alternative that minimizes movement of the notes from one to the next tetrad in the circle.

The harmony and tuning are as the one described here.

BosendorNew.jpg

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Resolution in Blue #16

Resolution in Blue #10

This is another pass through the algorithm for this piece. There is heavy use of indeterminacy, with the system choosing among lists of lists of lists of notes, phrases, slides, chords, arpeggios, volumes, sample sets, and the likelihood of erasing notes at random times to reduce density. This version uses same harmony and tuning as the one described here, with a few more iterations and a faster fade out.

BosendorNew.jpg

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Resolution in Blue #10

Resolution in Blue #7

This is a more or less final version of the piece I’ve been working on lately. It uses a progression that is close to a circle of fifths:

  • A- minor
  • F minor
  • C minor
  • G minor
  • D# minor
  • B- minor

The scales are all 16-note utonal scales, with the root each in position 9. So, G minor’s root is 3:2, A- minor’s root is 5:3, and B- minor’s root is 11:6. The descending notes are shown here:
resolu.jpg

The piece spends most of its time in A- (5:3) minor. There is a chorus that includes the circle of fifths voiced so that it sounds like it’s either rising or falling, even though it’s actually jumping up a 3:2 (or close to 3:2).

I’ve divided the scales into four tetrads, in varying degrees of consonants. Relative to the root of the scale, tetrad A contains 1:1, 6:5, 3:2, and 12:7, which is a pretty conventional just intonation minor 7th. Tetrad B contains 8:5, 24:13, 12:11, and 4:3. The other 8 notes are used less frequently, until the end. There are lots of chords that slide from tetrad A to B and visa versa. I also use many trills, and some slides with vibrato on long notes that sounds like a guitar with a whammy bar.

This is a transformation of a piece I wrote several years ago called “Resolution in Blue“, after the phrase the U.N. uses for a written draft of a resolution. This just uses the progression of that piece, and throws everything else away. Except the whammy bar.

BosendorNew.jpg

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Resolution in Blue #7

Tsantsa Circle Dance #4

This is a more or less final version of the transformation of the piece, Tsantsa Circle Dance, written in 2002, this time played on Prent’s Microtonal Slide Bosendorfers.

In today’s version, I updated the voicings for the bridge chords so that they move smoothly up or down a roughly chromatic scale, even though they are not chromatically related. For example, there is the following sequence of keys, and I play the 1:1 5:4 3:2 and 7:4 tetrad in each key. But I array them so that the first chord, D+ major, is voiced 4:5:6:7, the second F major is voiced 7:4:5:6. That way it seems to go up by very small degrees, when the change of key is larger. This way, it takes me about 24 chord changes to rise an octave. Here it is in cents:
tsantsac

These chords are in the 15-limit diamond as the otonality on 4:3, 8:5, 1:1, 16:11, 16:9, and back to 8:7.

Each chord can take advantage of all the 16 notes in the otonality scale to the 31-limit. Here is an example in D+:
tsantad.jpg

tsantsa

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Tsantsa Circle Dance #4

Tsantsa Circle Dance #2

This is a work in progress. I’ve yet to add in some of the most interesting parts of the original piece, but those will come. I completed the bridge section, which has a circle of chords to contrast with the theme in D+maj (8:7).

.chorus1 &Fnmaj.&all-031*. &Abmaj.&all-031*. &C2maj.&all-031*. &G-maj.&all-031*. &A#maj.&all-031*.

These chords are in the 15-limit diamond as the otonality on 4:3, 8:5, 1:1, 16:11, 16:9, and back to 8:7.

tsantsa

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Tsantsa Circle Dance #2

Tsantsa Circle Dance #1

This is new piece based on a work I did in 2002 called the Tsantsa Circle Dance. That one was scored for flute, finger piano, tuba, trombone, violin, cello, guitar, double bass, and percussion. The chord progression made use of a set of scales from the 15-limit tonality diamond. Today’s is scored for Prent’s Microtonal Slide Bosendorfers, and uses the 31-limit tonality diamond. This is just a beginning, and I’ll work on including more of the progressions used in the original, and work some of the rough parts in the near future.

tsantsa

Tsantsa is a native South American Indian term for shrunken heads. It’s a dance number. Or the original was.

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Tsantsa Circle Dance #1