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The bridge

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At the end of the bridge, we hear G, then a 53rd tone step up, then another, and back down again. I can’t even hear the change.

Settling down

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Circling around the fourths in minor keys, then find the major key to state the theme. Still needs better dynamics. Later.

More Aimless Wandering about the Circle of Fourths

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How aimless? How’s this:


17 39 08 30 52 21 43 12 34 03 25
47 16 38 07 29 51 20 42 11 33 02
24 46 15 37 06 28 50 19 41 10 32

Those are the keys in which it wanders, spending only a measure in each. In 53 tone equal temperament, those are all 22 steps, or a perfect fourth apart. You can see we get close to the start, when it hits 16, then 38, which is like the first two chords 17 & 39. After a short while the repetitive chord changes just leave one with a feeling of never ending change. Not a pleasant feeling in my mind.

Cycle of Fourths – Misses by One


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A cycle of fourths looks like the chart on the right.

In 53-tone to the octave equal temperament, 22 steps makes a perfect fourth. Start on E, and see what happens after 13 modulations. Instead of coming back to 17, you end up on 16. So what do you do when you don’t come our right? I slide up by one and make up the difference. Otherwise I suppose I could go around again. How many would I have to cycle through? 54. Naturally.

Slow down a bit

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Lots more trills in the flute and cello. This is going round a circle of fifths, but keeps missing the destination by one out of 53.

Chords based on fourths

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Instead of triads based on the 4:5:6 and the 7:9:11, these are based on 5:7:9, 7:12:16, and other fourth based triads.

Crescendo and decrescendo

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I’ve finally added crescendo and decrescendo ability to my macro preprocessor to Csound. Now, after I’ve generated the wave file, I run it through Csound again to modulate the overall amplitude. I can’t believe I relied on the volume of each note making the increase or decrease in loudness. How cumbersome it was! Every note had to be hand set to the desired volume, and the envelopes changed to implement an increase in sound.