More Naima

As you may know, I am somewhat obsessed with the song Naima by John Coltrane. For those who would like to wander down a jazz alley consisting of nothing but people playing nothing but Naima, as I did tonight on Rhapsody, here’s a playlist.

My Rhapsody Playlist

You have to have the service, which is great if you like other people’s music and are willing to sit at your computer and listen, neither of which I am. But, you never can tell when you might be at someone’s house who pays the $10-15 dollars a month to have unlimited access to music at their computers. I only listen to music while I walk, or if my kids are playing. That’s why I prefer podcasts. But that’s just me. This experiment with 33 versions of Naima has been terrific. I highly recommend it if you can spend the time. I only listened to the first 24 bars or so of each. Can you imagine what Barry White could have done with this song if had set his mind to it? Breathless…

Naima #17

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This is a work in progress…

Extended. There is some tuning problems at the end. The last two chords are a 7/4 major to an 8/5 major. I’m going to have to look into that some time…

Trumpet Song #16 – Naima

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This is a work in progress…

Today I corrected the tuning of the bass flute, which was as much as 50 cents sharp on some low notes. I still need more fine tuning. It is hard to tune a sample with such deep vibrato. On the plane from Denver to Omaha I was able to get close. More accuracy will require some quiet time.

Trumpet Song #15 – Naima

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This is a work in progress…

Just a small change of instrumentation from alto flute to bass flute, and an adjustment from 24+24+24+24+8 to 48+32+48 in the bass finger piano.

Trumpet Song #13

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This is a work in progress…

I wonder what happens when I give up on those University of Iowa brass samples and switch the the tried and true finger piano, alto flute, and harp samples? I guess I’m just not but out to make slow music. The faster it goes, the more I like the sound.

Trumpet Music 12

This is a work in progress…

Still in just intonation, but some notes outside the diamond.

  1. C 1/1 major
  2. F 4/3 minor
  3. C 28/15 major
  4. A 5/3 major
  5. B 7/4 major

C 28/15 is really close to B 15/8. 225:224 away. But the E 7/6 of C 28/15 is a perfect 5:4 above the C 28/15, and there are other 7:x rations all over the place to give it a sense of continuity. This is the first time I’ve ever ventured outside the diamond.

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Trumpet Song 11

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This is a work in progress…

The Coltrane favorite in wacked out just intonation.

  1. d 10/9 minor 7 with a g 3/2 in the bass
  2. g 3/2 minor 7
  3. c 1/1 major 7 – b 16/9 major 7 – with a g 3/2 in the bass
  4. c 1/1 major 7 with a g 3/2 in the bass

Trumpet Song #9

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This is a work in progress…

Today’s installment has a kind of fanfare sound to it, ending with the trumpets and trombones loud and triumphant. The scale is a major scale, but based on the utonality. Picture a 15-limit Partch tonality diamond with the center on middle “C”.

The overtones go up and to the right, the undertones go down and to the right. Go down the undertone series from C 1/1 to A 8/5 to F 4/3. Then you can go up the overtone series on F 4/3. This would make a sort of major scale.

  1. F 4/3
  2. G 3/2
  3. A 5/3
  4. B 11/6
  5. C 1/1
  6. D 13/12
  7. two different sevenths (E 7/6 and E 5/4)
  8. F 4/3

On the right is the scale derived from the tonality diamond. I use that scale all the time in my just intonation music. I love the stong major third a 5:4 above the root, the solid major second at 9:8, a clearly just seventh at 7:4, and that wierd 11:8. Play them together and you get the traditional just sound, complete with a solid root combination tone. Play the even overtones and the combination tone jumps an octave, play the odds and it drops back down. Lots to play with here.

But consider another major scale hidden inside the diamond. Go up the overtone series from C 1/1 to E 5/4, then down the undertone series from there to the right. Pull out another “major” scale that uses the notes shown below on the right, in the order listed on the left.

  1. F 4/3
  2. two different seconds (F 10/7, G 20/13)
  3. A 5/3
  4. B 20/11
  5. C 1/1
  6. D 10/9
  7. E 5/4
  8. F 4/3

This is a scale that also has a lot of material. You have a solid just major third and fifth, providing the traditional just 4:5:6 of the overtone scale. Then you have two different seconds, a major and a minor, neither of which are like to 12 tone equal major or minor seconds. The sixth is a sweet minor third (6:5) below the root. If you need it, there is a minor third chord based on A 5/3, C 1/1, E 5/4 inside the scale. The fourth note in the scale has the sting of the 11th undertone. The seventh is the traditional 15:8 above the root, for those major seventh heaven moments.