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Sing in 53 – EDO

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This is a work in progress…

And today we have a bit more control over the percussion. Still in C major, but I’ve also put some work into making the modulation easier.

Another in a series – Working towards a piece in 53 Tone Equal Divisions of the Octave – 53-EDO

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Considering the ability to modulate, why not refer to all chords as relative steps:

Here’s how major triads in their three inversions can be written. First you see the inversions of the 4:5:6 overtones, then the 9:11:14 overtone triads:

.maj3-u-a135 t+0 t+17 t+14
.maj3-u-a351 o-1t+17 t+14 t+22
.maj3-u-a513 o-1t+31 t+22 t+17
@
.maj3-u-b247 t+9 t+16 t+18 t+19
.maj3-u-b472 o-1t+25 t+18 t+19 t+16
.maj3-u-b724 o-1t+43 t+19 t+16 t+18
@

Then when you want to call a chord, just start it with the key like this:

t0&maj3-u-a3*.

This translates to Csound code for three notes at scales steps 17, 17+14=31, and 31+22 = 53, which translates to 0, the tonic.

More insect life as percussion from the Dry Spring.

Sing the song in 53 – 2

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These are samples from an instrument I made in 1975 or so. It’s a piece of 1/4 inch Sitka Spruce, with a contact microphone attached. I’ve glued assorted noise makers to the surface of the wood. Each is rubbed with rosined fingers, struck, or scraped with small tools. I call it a dry spring.

Sing in 53

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This is a work in progress…

Consider it a requirement that I write at least one piece in 53 tone equal before I turn 54 in March. Equal sure is easier for modulation. This one stays in the Partch tonality diamond, but it could easily just wander out at a moment’s notice.

Ballon Drum Song

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More percussion, some changes to the bass line to add glissandi, and two alto flutes instead of one.

Trumpet Music for Flute, Harp, and Finger Piano but no Trumpet. Now why is that?

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This time I’ve added a bit of intentional “munchkinization” to some of the samples. That is, I intentionally use a sample of a note two or three notes lower than normally chosen, which results in a sharper timbre. The choice is randomized. The effect is kind of like playing closer or farther from the bridge on a string instrument. The effect is applied to the finger piano and harp chords and arpeggios.

The first few measures are all here

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This is a work in progress…

Now that the first few measures have been complete, I need to go back and liven things up a bit. There’s too much repetition here.