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Summer – 757-200 Edit

This page has the original Summer playlist. This alternative take was computed on a flight to NY on a Boeing 757-200. Nice plane. 4 1/2 hours from Seattle to JFK. Return flight on a 737 took six hours. Check out Fragaria on this take. Love that slide guitar.
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  1. Clover - Like Wind #11

    Prent Rodgers

  2.   
  3. Alpine Daisies - Roof of Wind #38

    Prent Rodgers

  4.   
  5. Lupin - Like Trees #18

    Prent Rodgers

  6.   
  7. Fragaria - Philosophers #14

    Prent Rodgers

  8.   
  9. Castilleja - Deep Water #17

    Prent Rodgers

  10.   
  11. Solidago - And Fools #8

    Prent Rodgers

  12.   
  13. Epilobium - Inviolate Sand #10

    Prent Rodgers

Summer – Alternative Edit

This page has the original Summer playlist. Because of the algorithmic nature of my music, I can create different versions relatively easily. Here is an alternative take on the seven Summer pieces.
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  1. Clover - Like Wind #10

    Prent Rodgers

  2.   
  3. Alpine Daisies - Roof of Wind #37

    Prent Rodgers

  4.   
  5. Lupin - Like Trees #17

    Prent Rodgers

  6.   
  7. Fragaria - Philosophers #13

    Prent Rodgers

  8.   
  9. Castilleja - Deep Water #16

    Prent Rodgers

  10.   
  11. Solidago - And Fools #7

    Prent Rodgers

  12.   
  13. Epilobium - Inviolate Sand #9

    Prent Rodgers

Alpine Daisy – Roof of Wind #28

This version is a final one. I’ve updated some of the balance between the instruments and added a few 13 and 15 limit intervals to the previous 11 limit version. Mostly this is just running the algorithm over and over until I like the results.

I felt that previous versions were too dense. To reduce the density, I stole a technique that Harry Partch employed in Castor & Pollux. That piece is structured as three duets, followed by all the instruments playing their same parts together in a “tutti” section. While two players execute their duet, the other four instrumentalists are silent. For the “tutti” they play together. This is done twice, symbolizing the birth of both Castor and Pollux. In this way, you get to listen to the individual parts and to the collection of all the instruments together. It’s very effective in his piece. I hope it will help mine as well.

I made up three quartets (rather than duets) out of the ensemble of 12 instruments. (a Duodecet as Wiki tells it)

  1. Quartet one
    • finger Piano
    • harp
    • tuba
    • bassoon
  2. Quartet two
    • baritone guitar
    • bass finger piano
    • English horn
    • flute
  3. Quartet three
    • piano
    • vibraphone
    • balloon drums
    • French Horn
  4. Ensemble Duodecet
    • finger Piano
    • harp
    • tuba
    • bassoon
    • baritone guitar
    • bass finger piano
    • English horn
    • flute
    • piano
    • vibraphone
    • balloon drums
    • French Horn

When each quartet plays 12 measures of 6 to 192 beats in duration, I move to the next quartet. Partch made sure each section was almost exactly two minutes in length. I’m more flexible, and allow the Drunkard Walk to determine the measure duration. Here, each measure is in a different key in the Tonality Diamond. Partch was more flexible in this area.

After the three quartets, all the instruments play together for 12 measures, followed by a very short repeating section where the randomness is greatly reduced. This provides a kind of climax of sorts at the end of each of the four sections.

Unlike Castor & Pollux, there is no repeating relationship between what the quartets play and what the whole ensemble plays. Instead, I use the Drunkard’s Walk Markov Chain to pick unique material at every stage.

Dasies

Alpine Daisy has a Latin name of Erigeron compositus. It’s all over Western Washington from June through August. The second half of the title is taken from a quote in Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury:

And I will look down and see my murmuring bones and the deep water like wind, like a roof of wind, and after a long time they cannot distinguish even bones upon the lonely and inviolate sand.


or download here:
Alpine Daisy – Roof of Wind #28

Alpine Daisy – Roof of Wind #24

I made a significant change in the structure of the piece in this version. To reduce the excessive density, I used a technique that Harry Partch employed in Castor & Pollux. That piece is structured as three duets, followed by all the instruments playing their same parts together in a “tutti” section. While two players execute their duet, the other four instrumentalists are silent. This is done twice, symbolizing the birth of both Castor and Pollux. In this way, you get to listen to the individual parts and to the collection of all the instruments together. It’s very effective in his piece. I hope it will help mine as well.

I made up three quartets (rather than duets) out of the ensemble of 12 instruments I have been using:

  1. Quartet one
    • finger Piano
    • harp
    • tuba
    • bassoon
  2. Quartet two
    • baritone guitar
    • bass finger piano
    • English horn
    • flute
  3. Quartet three
    • piano
    • vibraphone
    • balloon drums
    • French Horn

When each quartet plays 12 measures of 6 to 192 beats in duration, I move to the next quartet. Partch made sure each section was almost exactly two minutes in length. I’m more flexible, and allow the Drunkard Walk to determine the measure duration. Here, each measure is in a different key in the Tonality Diamond. Partch was more flexible in this area.

After the three quartets, all the instruments play together for 12 measures, then there is a repeating section where the randomness is greatly reduced. This provides a kind of climax of sorts at the end of each of the four sections.

Unlike Castor & Pollux, there is no repeating relationship between what the quartets play and what the whole ensemble plays. Instead, I use the Drunkard’s Walk Markov Chain to pick unique material at every stage.

Dasies

Alpine Daisy has a Latin name of Erigeron compositus. It’s all over Western Washington from June through August. The second half of the title is taken from a quote in Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury:

And I will look down and see my murmuring bones and the deep water like wind, like a roof of wind, and after a long time they cannot distinguish even bones upon the lonely and inviolate sand.


or download here:
Alpine Daisy – Roof of Wind #24

Alpine Daisy – Roof of Wind #13

Still a work in progress, this version includes a unison part for alto flute and English horn, and some other winds, strings, and balloon drums. Still working on the density. It’s a bit busy now.

Dasies

Erigeron compositus is the latin name for Alpine Daisy. It’s all over Western Washington in late August. The second half of the title is taken from a quote in Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury:

And I will look down and see my murmuring bones and the deep water like wind, like a roof of wind, and after a long time they cannot distinguish even bones upon the lonely and inviolate sand.


or download here:
Alpine Daisy – Roof of Wind #13

Alpine Daisy – Roof of Wind #6

This is a piece that attempts to limit the diversity of the notes chosen. There is are four lists of eight notes, four lists of eight durations, 16 chords through which to modulate, and lots of instruments that choose what to play. Most of the time I use the Drunkard’s Walk, but sometimes I attempt to further limit the degree of randomness and increase the level of repetitiveness. Still working on the balance here.

Dasies

Erigeron compositus is the latin name for Alpine Daisy. It’s all over Western Washington in late August. The second half of the title is taken from a quote in Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury:

And I will look down and see my murmuring bones and the deep water like wind, like a roof of wind, and after a long time they cannot distinguish even bones upon the lonely and inviolate sand.


or download here:
Alpine Daisy – Roof of Wind #6

Epilobium – Inviolate Sand #7

This is the final version of piece that makes extensive use of envelopes, trills, slides, and other tools to transform percussion instrument sounds. It’s scored for baritone guitar strings, finger piano, grand piano, harp, vibraphone, balloon drums and tuba. There is some less than random parts, and some drunkard walks.

2016-08-26 16.37.54

Epilobium Angustifolium is the latin name for pink fireweed. It’s all over Western Washington in late August. The second half of the title is taken from a quote in Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury:

And I will look down and see my murmuring bones and the deep water like wind, like a roof of wind, and after a long time they cannot distinguish even bones upon the lonely and inviolate sand.


or download here:
Epilobium – Inviolate Sand #7

Epilobium – Invoilate Sand #5

This is another piece that makes extensive use of envelopes to transform percussion instrument sounds. It’s scored for baritone guitar strings, finger piano, grand piano, harp, vibraphone, balloon drums and tuba. There is some less than random parts, and some drunkard walks.

2016-08-26 16.37.54

Epilobium Angustifolium is the latin name for pink fireweed. It’s all over Western Washington in late August. The second half of the title is taken from a quote in Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury:

And I will look down and see my murmuring bones and the deep water like wind, like a roof of wind, and after a long time they cannot distinguish even bones upon the lonely and inviolate sand.


or download here:
Epilobium – #5

Epilobium – Inviolate Sand #4

This is another piece that makes extensive use of envelopes to transform percussion instrument sounds. It’s scored for baritone guitar strings, finger piano, grand piano, harp, vibraphone, balloon drums and tuba. There is some less than random parts, and some drunkard walks.

2016-08-26 16.37.54

Epilobium Angustifolium is the latin name for pink fireweed. It’s all over Western Washington in late August. The second half of the title is taken from a quote in Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury:

And I will look down and see my murmuring bones and the deep water like wind, like a roof of wind, and after a long time they cannot distinguish even bones upon the lonely and inviolate sand.


or download here:
Epilobium – #4